Wales Coast Path – Flint Castle to Greenfield Dock

Do you remember that ‘super’ weekend we had in March? Solar eclipse on the Friday, super weather on Saturday and Sunday, super moon (even though we couldn’t see it) and a super tide. So I decided to go for a super walk along the Wales Coast Path. I had tried the same stretch the previous year but some parts were closed off because of storm damage.
Flint Castle2I started at Flint Castle and was surprised how close the water was to the castle walls because of the super tide. Usually, even at high tide, it doesn’t reach them and you could have easily taken a bath at some of the seats and picnic tables. Lets just say I wasn’t the only spectator.

flint castle1I didn’t visit the castle itself this time (if you’re interested you can find some pictures here) and instead pressed on.
Flint Castle3The path is very idyllic and provides great views across the Dee Estuary and towards the West Wirral on this stretch.

First I reached Flint Dock which was built in the 1800s to export lead from Halkyn Mountain and later coal and timber. It’s hard to believe but this quiet quayside was once the busiest place in Flint.

Flint Dock. Last time I was here, there was only mud and no water at all.

Flint Dock. Last time I was here, there was only mud and no water at all.

Taken during my last vist.

Taken during my last vist.

The beacon at Flint Point is lit for special events.

Flint Point offers excellent views across the estuary.

Flint Point offers excellent views across the estuary.

You get magnificent views back towards Flintshire Bridge and Connah’s Quay Power Station and up the estuary towards Greenfield.

Coast Path2

Looking towards Greenfield

Coast Path

There are plenty of signs for the coast path so you can’t miss it.

sheep

No walk in Wales without some sheep…

bird water

…but obviously you get some other animals too.

In its heyday 30 ships a day would land at Bagillt Station Gutter carrying lead, coal and copper as well as passengers from Liverpool.

Bagillt DockBettisfield Colliery was the largest and most important coal mines in Bagillt during the 19th century and employed over 500 men. Amazingly some mine shafts were even dug under the estuary itself with only two small pumps to drain the water away.

Bettisfield Colliery

Unfortunately not in good shape these days.

Bettisfield Colliery2

You still get a sense for the size of the colliery.

Bettisfield carpark

If you go to the car park you can meet ‘Bettisfield Bob’

The dragon sculpture has a beacon on its back which is lit along with other beacons along the coast during special events. Underneath it is a time capsule placed there by local people.

Bettisfield beacon

Properly Welsh – a dragon sculpture for the beacon

Bettisfield panorama

View from the beacon across the estuary and towards the west Wirral.

Fisherman’s Inlet – local fisherman have fished here for generations.

Bettisfield boatsGreenfield Dock – even though there has been some activity here since the Roman times, it wasn’t until the legend of St Winefride’s Well in nearby Holywell that pilgrims started flocking here from the Wirral, Liverpool and further away. As industry in Greenfield Valley grew, the dock expanded and copper from Anglesey was unloaded here and sent to the valley’s mills to be turned into copper goods.

Greenfield boats

Today you can only find small boats at Greenfield Dock.

Greenfield1

Statue on the other side of the dock.

I have walked several stretches of the Wales Coast Path so far and am absolutely hooked. Guess that means more walking for me during the summer months.

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3 thoughts on “Wales Coast Path – Flint Castle to Greenfield Dock

  1. Pingback: Year of adventure  | design and dragons

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